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Occupational Therapist Students are Learning Assistive Technology with Help from MobilityWorks

MobilityWorks Teaching OT students Assistive Technology

Becoming an Occupational Therapist is no easy task. It typically requires at least six years of college with in-depth medical courses and training. Once they graduate, Occupational Therapists spend their career assisting patients recovering from a physical illness or injury, to help them achieve the highest level of mobility possible. As part of their training, Occupational Therapy students are learning how assistive technology can help aide the patients they will serve one day.

MobilityWorks own Regional Marketing Manager, Craig Harlow, has been teaching Assistive Technology classes around the Philadelphia area since 2011. Every semester, Craig teaches a guest course at Temple University and The University of the Sciences on wheelchair accessible equipment. He brings in both rear entry and side entry accessible minivans and demonstrates how each different style of ramp operates. Students also hear from a Certified Driver Rehabilitation Specialist (CDRS) about the training and certification that is required for someone to learn how to drive with hand controls.

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Hands Free Prototype Wheelchair Moves by Leaning Forward or Side-to-Side

ogo-wheelchair-photos

Wheelchair of the Future?

After four years of research and development, Kevin Halsall has finally unveiled his incredible new invention. The New Zealand native has created a hands free prototype wheelchair for his friend Marcus Thompson, who was paralyzed after a skiing accident. The OGO is a mix of a wheelchair and a Segway that balances on two wheels, adjusting and moving as the person sitting in the chair leans forward, backward, or side to side. Halsall, who is an engineer by trade, purchased a Segway, disassembled the device and then reconstructed it around a wheelchair.

“It’s one of the life affirming things that this machine does, it puts you in touch with your whole body again,” Mr. Thompson said.

The OGO has a top speed of 12 miles per hour and the wheels can even be swapped out for off-road capabilities. Its’ heavy duty battery gives it an expected range of almost 18 miles and the lightweight frame makes it easy to transport. The OGO is a finalist in the National Innovators Awards and is in the process of being made available for purchase. A price has yet to be determined, but Mr. Halsall wants to keep it as low as possible so the OGO is affordable for those who need it.

Watch the OGO YouTube Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgat4a1TrEM

 To learn more about the OGO, visit their website at //ogotechnology.com.